Compassion: Sacrificing a little luxury for someone else’s necessity.

I feel silly trying to write about an experience that I can’t even put into words. The magnitude of the evening still sits on my heart and flows through my thoughts, leaving my spirit dancing and my face smiling.


I had the privilege to volunteer for Compassion at a local Rend Collective show. To give a bit of background, the last time I was at a Rend Collective show, the girl behind me asked me to make her a bag just like the one I designed and was carrying. My first order! And so Ginger Lane, now BEVY Goods, began. Also at that show, I learned all about Compassion and committed to using a portion of profits to sponsoring a child. So Compassion + Rend Collective hold a deep spot in my heart and am grateful for how God has worked through them.


This time I was on the other side, and able to be one of the people handing out the child packets to audience members. I was able to talk to people about the girl we sponsor and share stories of how our relationship has grown.

A photo of our girl, her family, and the goat they were able to buy with funds through Compassion.


The heartbreaking moments came when we held stacks of cards in our hands, and realized just how many children need to be sponsored. Sponsoring a child is so much more than having money automatically deducted from your bank account every month. It is a relationship, filled with letter writing and sharing stories. Sometimes giving love and giving of yourself is much hard than giving money. But so much more valuable.

Patrick from Rend Collective said it best: “we can sacrifice a little luxury for someone else’s necessity”. It costs $38 a month to sponsor a child. To some, $38 is the cost of two pumpkin spice lattes a week or a t-shirt bought on a whim at Target that you’ll never wear. Little luxuries.

Please consider sponsoring a child through Compassion.

This is not an ad, I don’t work for Compassion. I just love what they are doing. 


A Dragon Master teaches us to give


You may have already seen the story of Santino and his dragons on Facebook or the Today Show, but I couldn’t resist spreading the word about this amazing boy and his business. Not only is this a worthwhile cause, but looking through the site gave me a chance to talk with my boys about how God created each of us (our similarities and differences) and having compassion, an open mind and a loving heart. All while they picked out three favorite dragon prints and begged for their own t-shirts.


This is the story of Santino, a 10 year boy, boldly nicknamed “The Dragon Master” by his younger brother. A story that I’m sure is full, but is brought to light because of his dragon drawings. Santino was diagnosed with autism at age 5. One way that he enjoyed expressing himself was through drawing dragons. So after being teased one day, his parents bought him a blank white t-shirt and markers in order to help work through his emotions. As a mom to boys, I find this is brilliant on so many levels, as every day is an attempt to understand my children and help them express themselves.


After a Facebook post from Lisa, Santino’s mom, of him working on a t-shirt went viral and brought in over 100 orders, you can now shop for your own dragon shirts on Santino’s Dragon Drawings website.

“Santino decided to donate half of his money to the Center for Autism, a nonprofit that Lisa said has changed her son’s life by teaching him how to communicate his feelings, problem-solve and understand social cues.

“I don’t want to be the only one who gets the money,” Santino said of why he chose to donate his proceeds. “I want to help other kids with autism.”

Let’s support Santino and his mission to help other kids with autism. Let’s learn from Santino’s generous heart.

For Bevy updates and discounts, sign up for our newsletter!

Kids Helping Kids

I recently brought the boys to volunteer at Cradles to Crayons‘ Giving Factory, with a local moms group. I have been waiting for this moment. When they would be old enough to know when it’s time to serve & work and not play. Six seems to be the magical number for my boys.


Right as we arrived,  I quickly learned I would have to leave to move my car. And when I returned, I could see my boys already hard at work.  The stress caused by getting lost multiple times, being late, and not being able to find parking, was quickly washed away. There they were, all set up in the Toy section: gloves on, spray bottles in hand, toothbrushes for scrubbing. They were working. They were serving. They were loving other children.

20131017-084121.jpg  20131017-084108.jpg  20131017-084044.jpg  20131017-084141.jpg

I can’t say enough about how great an experience it was. At the debrief, they told us our group helped 72 children. 72! The boys were so proud of this number. They quickly asked when they could come back and do it again. Scrubbing toys is such a fun and easy job for young kids. Older kids and adults can volunteer in one of the many different areas: sorting clothing, equipment, books.


On the long walk back to the car, we talked about why it is important to serve others. We talked about how there are so many children who don’t have toys. We talked about gratitude. We talked about how God wants us to show His love to others. And for the first time in all my attempts to teach them about giving, I think they started to get it. They felt complete joy by being able to help other kids!


Ways you can help?

>> Please consider volunteering at Cradles to Crayons in either their Boston or Philly locations.

>> Donate new or gently used toys, clothes, books, baby equipment.

>> Winter is coming! Heavy coats, mittens, boots, hats are needed. Even if you don’t have a Cradles to Crayons near you, donate to Salvation Army. They’ll even send a truck to you to pick up your goods.

Join Team Kate


Friends, can we all come together an help an old friend from high school? Kate is a 38 year old mom to a 5 year old girl, friend to many. Only she is living the unthinkable.

“The thing that gets me is I’m 38 years old. I’m healthy. I have a healthy weight, I’m a healthy eater. And in just one day … poof.”


From Team Kate Fundraiser

In June of 2013 Kate felt a little off, a little fuzzy. She was concerned enough about the way she was feeling to have a friend drive her to the ER. Once there, the Doctors could find nothing wrong, and she was sent home. Soon thereafter, she found herself waking up on the kitchen floor alone. She later found out it was a seizure that caused her to black out and fall. This scare prompted her to, once again, take a trip to the hospital. It was this hospital visit where the Doctors realized something was really wrong.

Kate endured a spinal tap, CT scans, MRI’s and countless other tests to find out she needed a brain biopsy.  The results of this biopsy confirmed something none of us wanted to hear. Kate was officially diagnosed with a malignant, grade II, astrocytoma brain tumor contained in the left frontal and temporal lobes. The doctors told her the tumor, which is the size of a plum, had infiltrated her brain with a growth rate at 8-10%.

This part gives me goosebumps. Though the powers of Facebook, Kate reconnected with our fellow classmate, Lisa, who just happens to be a nurse practitioner for the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana Farber Cancer Institute, here in Boston. As a result, Dana Farber doctors have been able to work with her doctors in Florida, determining the best course of action. (Here’s their full story from our local paper. Remember the Sudbury Mafia? See, we’re everywhere…)

Here’s how you can help:

Give Money

Kate has not been able to work since June. Besides the usual bills, let’s help with medical bills. A single mom, unable to work, she is now on Medicaid, which does not cover many of her medical expenses. Let’s help her fly to Boston for future testing and possible surgery. Even just $5 helps. Make a donation on the Team Kate Fundraiser page.

Online gift cards to help care for her family are also a huge help: Whole Foods, Target, Publix. Send them directly to Kate:

Give Love

Head over to Facebook and like Team Kate. Follow her story. Genuinely pray for her, for health, for her daughter, for the wisdom of the doctors. Help ease any burdens. Encourage. Connect. Give Love.

Big news!

It’s here. After months (years) of prayers, listening, waiting, dreaming, tinkering, playing…it’s here.


Inspired by Al Andrews, to become an improbable philanthropist.

Inspired by Jon Acuff, to Start. (First inspired by Quitter, but I can’t quit my day job as a mom.)

Inspired by Rebecca at Better Life Bags (where I first admitted my dream “Design something awesome + Change people’s lives”), Megan at She Does Justice and Sarah at BeCause to start a business that combines creative talents & giving.

Inspired by Mike Donehey to sponsor children through Compassion.

Grateful for the encouragement of friends and strangers that have purchased bags already.

Come on over to or the Ginger Lane Goods Etsy store or the Spoonflower fabric store!

Reece’s Rainbow (Host a Lemonade Stand)

I’m excited to have Rachel, a fellow Influence Network-er, here sharing her story and giving project. This is a great way to get your kids involved in giving: host a lemonade stand and donate the proceeds to Reece’s Rainbow.

The mission of Reece’s Rainbow is to rescue orphans with Down syndrome through the gift of adoption, to raise awareness for all of the children who are waiting in 25 countries around the world, and to raise funds as adoption grants that help adoptive families afford the high cost of adopting these beautiful children.

About Reece’s Rainbow

Please visit Rachel’s blog for a list of great tips for hosting a Lemonade Stand for Reece’s Rainbow  and let her know that you will be joining her Lemonade Stand Campaign!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>   <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

I am thankful and honored to have this opportunity to guest post today.  So that you know a little bit of who you are hearing from here are the basics, I am 34 year old wife to a soon to be pastor, (he is finishing up seminary this summer.) I am a mother to five wonderful(most of time) children(one of which is due to be born any day now.) Our life is often messy but in the mess we get to see God make something beautiful in our lives.  I would love for you to come by my blog, and get to know my family and I better.

 My heart grew significantly for orphans with Down Syndrome and special needs after the birth and Down Syndrome diagnosis of my first Son Sam in 2009. 

After Sam was born while doing research on the Internet on his condition, Down Syndrome I discovered an amazing organization called Reece’s Rainbow. They are in the business of redeeming orphans with special needs. Special needs orphans are the bottom of the barrel as far as orphans go, they are often living is horrible conditions with out adequate housing, clothing, food, medical care and worst of all human interaction. Often children with mild and moderate disabilities are left in crib rooms for there whole life, never escaping the bars and white walls.

JOIN US and “MAKE A STAND FOR ORPHANS!!” Host a lemonade stand in the month of May or collect change to give toward the redemption of beautiful special needs children around the world.  You can give  directly to Reece’s Rainbow and receive a tax deduction. FOR MORE TIPS PLEASE VISIT MY BLOG AND LET LEMONADE BE USED TO REDEEM!!

Make & Give Away: Headbands


You can put a smile on the face of a terminally ill child! Remember Sarah’s guest post about her Little Ladybug Shoppe? She is sharing how she makes the headbands and clip-on accessories that she hands out at local Children’s Hospitals. So now you can make them too and distribute to children at your local hospital! (Please be sure to contact your local organization’s volunteer coordinator before donating.)

These headbands and accessories are easy enough that school-age children can make them, with a little help from an adult. What a great way to teach kids about giving to others! Email me if you are able to participate – we would love to hear about your experience!

From Sarah:

Little Ladybug Shoppe has the unique opportunity to provide handmade hair accessories to young girls diagnosed with terminal illnesses.  It is my hope that this small act of kindness will be a true blessing to them.

I wanted to add my reasoning behind these nylon headbands.  Since the girls who will be receiving these bands have terminal illnesses, I wanted to be considerate of the fact that they might have no hair due to chemo, bruise easily due to medication or treatments, or very sensitive skin due to their specific condition.  I thought the soft nylon bands would be the most comfortable option, and allowing the removable accessories would add some fun and variety.
Thank you so much for your interest in joining Little Ladybug Shoppe‘s mission to bless terminally ill children.  I hope we can be a ray of sunshine to them all.
Below is the tutorial for just the headband.
Supplies needed:
Colored nylons
1″ wide ribbon (color to match the nylons)
Fat quarters
Plain metal alligator clips
Hot glue gun
The band
1. Cut one leg of the pair of nylons and then cut down at the toe so you basically have a “sleeve”.
2. Measure 18″ and trim off any excess fabric.
3. Bring the two ends together and tuck one end inside the other.  Make sure it measures 8.5″ to make a standard child’s size headband.
4. Thread a running stitch to join the two ends together.
5. Pull the thread tightly so the fabric bunches up where you placed your stitch.
6. Wind the thread around the bunch several times and then finish with a couple of finishing knots in the back.
7. Cut a three inch piece of ribbon and use a hot glue gun to secure it around the fabric bunch.  Make sure it is tight, but just loose enough to slip an alligator clip underneath.
Please visit the Little Ladybug Shoppe for the rest of the tutorials. Learn how to make the clip-on accessories: bows, flowers and rosettes!