Maybe it’s time for a Fashion Diet


By now, we’s all heard about the dangers of GMOs,  overeating, junk food, processed foods, pesticides. Fast fashion is no different. Our need for more and cheaper – our over consumption of basically disposable clothing – can be damaging to all involved in the lifecycle. The documentary True Cost is unveiling the human suffering, the damage to communities and their environments, just so that we can have a $5 t-shirt that we may wear only once. A few short sentences will never convey the destruction of the mass produced fashion industry, so I highly encourage you to watch the movie (Netflix/Amazon/iTunes). (For more info, here is our Beginner’s Guide to Ethically-Made Fashion.)

One of the many facts that you can’t unsee or unlearn:

Only 10% of the clothes donated to charity or thrift stores are sold.

The other 90% ends up in landfills or flooding markets in developing countries overseas. Hurting their economy and environment.


(True Cost film still. Source.)

“The global trade of second-hand clothing is a multi-billion dollar industry for developed countries. With our clothing waste being sent overseas by the tons, there’s little chance of African countries, as a whole, developing their own textile trade. In the last 10 years, local industries, such as garment-making and tailoring, have collapsed, leaving hundreds of thousands of workers unemployed.”

Shannon Whitehead, “What really happens to your donated clothing


I’ll be honest, I have always loved the idea of donating my clothes. You think you’re doing something to help out another person. I will be the first to tell you that I’m the Queen of Rationalization. I can find a bright side to most anything. Need a new dress for a party? No prob, I’ll just donate it later.

Before watching the documentary, I happened to read the popular The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo, and am slowly “Konmari-ing” the crap out of my house. Reducing and organizing my clothes was freeing, but also eye-opening. I had A LOT of clothes I didn’t wear. Either it didn’t fit or I didn’t really like it anymore, whatever the reason, I had clothes just sitting there. Taking up space and collecting dust. So after an honest purge, six garbage bags were filled.

The worst was the tiny little dagger I felt when looking at an item that I loved and it just sat there reminding me of time when it did fit. How freeing it was to kick those clothes – and the negative self-talk that came with them – out of my house.

These, the clothes that I loved but couldn’t wear, were the ones I gave to friends. What an absolute joy it was to see them try them on, twirl around, and feel beautiful. Clothes that give the gift of happiness. Another bag went to my dear friend who hand delivers clothing and food to homeless people on the streets of Boston. Clothes that can help keep them warm. The rest was dropped off at Savers. Clothes that will find a new home (and hopefully not in a landfill).


  • Buy less.
  • Invest in quality pieces that will last. Here’s a list of some of my favorite ethical fashion brands.
  • Have extra jeans? Host a Sole Hope Shoe Cutting Party to cut shoe patterns to be made into shoes for kids in Uganda to protect their feet from harmful jiggers.
  • Trade/share clothes with friends.
  • Shop at thrift, vintage and consignment stores. Go rock a vintage Valentino jacket at your next holiday party. And jeans are always better worn-in.
  • Pull together clothes to be given directly to homeless or similar missions. Cradles to Crayons does an excellent job of involving the community (great for kids!) and giving directly to those in need.
  • Reduce the amount of cheap, fast fashion clothes you buy. I’m still working on this too, especially shopping for my boys. They only wear athletic pants (what they call “fancy pants”) and destroy them/grow so quickly that I end up at cheaply made places like Old Navy and Target.

Just as we teach our children: actions have consequences. Our need for more more more + cheaper cheaper cheaper has massive ethical and environmental consequences. The surprising thing for me, especially after Konmari-ing my own clothes, was the psychological impact of fashion in my own life. Why do we buy so much? Why do we feel like more will make us happier? Why do we feel like we deserve it? Stuff will never fulfill us. Stuff will never bring lasting joy.

As a side note, True Cost covers how horrible the cheap leather industry can be. At Bevy Goods, we are committed to investing in and using responsibly-sourced leather, which means our leathers are vegetable-tanned (reducing the amount of dangerous chromium that used) or comes from facilities that adhere to strict environmental codes and conditions. We are creating bags with lasting style + purpose: ethically-made bags that carry you from day to night. 

Sign up at Bevy Goods to join us on this journey and be the first to know when we are launching. And while you’re at it, let’s connect on InstagramFacebook & Twitter!

A Beginner’s Guide to Ethically-Made Fashion


Ethically-made. Ethical fashion. Sustainable fashion. Made in the USA.

What does it all mean?

Confession: When I started Bevy Goods, it was with primary purpose to put people first by providing jobs to those in need in the US, as well as supporting local, domestic manufacturing. I didn’t know anything about ethical or sustainable fashion. All I knew was that I wanted the heart and mission of my company to be focused on empowering people and building community. Then I completed the incredible ethical fashion accelerator program, Factory45, which started to open my eyes to the true cost that goes into the garments and accessories that fill our closets.


Defining ethical fashion is tricky because “ethical” can mean something different from person to person. As an umbrella statement, ethical fashion encompasses promoting ethical labor conditions, fair trade, animal welfare, environmentally kind and sustainable materials and production.

Some may disagree and see ethical fashion as a black & white issue: either it is all of these things or it is not. And that’s fine. But to me, ethical fashion is a journey. It reflects how you prioritize these issues based on your value system and beliefs. One may be adamant that everything they buy be free from any animal cruelty. Someone else may only buy items made with eco-friendly and sustainable materials. For others, people and production may come first. Ideally, it would be all of the above. But for the sake of this beginner’s guide, we will start with the issue of ethical production, fair wages and beneficial working conditions.


How do you currently think about something before you buy it? Style? Price? Fit? Trend? I’m not saying that I’m any different or better at this, but it’s important to realize that everything we buy has already been touched by a lot of people. And we have important purchasing power where we endorse the lifecycle (including wages, conditions, damage) of whatever we buy. No pressure, right?

But as G.I. Joe used to say, “knowing is half the battle”. We want to know that our apples are organic and that our cleaning products won’t harm our children. Shouldn’t we want to know if the shirt we’re wearing was made by someone who was treated inhumanely at a sweat shop? What went into making a t-shirt that a company can sell (for a profit) for $2.99?

What can we do? Dame Vivienne Westwood said it best:


I highly recommend watching the True Cost documentary on Netflix/Amazon/iTunes for more information on the ethical issues with fast fashion. And for a look at the environmental impact of fashion, check out The Reformation and Zady.


There is so much more on this topic. For now, here are a few of my favorite brands for women’s fashion. Each varies from the next in terms of ethical manufacturing and environmental impact.

Everlane – The leaders in transparency. Committed to finding ethical manufacturing, they will even tell you how much it cost to make the garment. Grab a t-shirt for $15, made in Los Angeles. You can’t get that at the GAP!

Brass Clothing – I just love Brass. Not only are they also from the Boston-area, but they have dresses in every shape, for every body type, and reasonable priced. They are committed to small batch manufacturing at a facility in China which they have developed personal relationships.

Jessica Faulkner – Timeless and fun pieces that are designed and Made in Los Angeles.

Eenvoud – A fellow Factor45er, Eenvoud is committed to transparent production practices, made in the US, and the use of sustainable materials. I just love her signature sleeveless tops can be dressed up or down. So perfect.

Hackwith Design – Working in small batches, the Hackwith designs are sewn in Minneapolis. I love their support for other independent makers, as well as the inclusion of plus sizes.

Milk & Thistle – So, I’m big on Made in the USA, but that is just for the purpose of supporting local talent, reducing travel costs of materials, building community and relationships. If I could pick an Australian sister, it would be Sydney-based Milk & Thistle, with a passion for textile design and committed to Made in Australia.

Jacob & Esau – Moving south of Sydney is Melbourne-based Jacob & Esau, an ethical, Made in Australia brand. I’m slightly biased because Melbourne is one of my favorite cities in the world. Just a note about Australian fashion if you’re based in the US: remember that we are on opposite seasons. As I sit here in Boston looking for sweaters and winter gear, their fashion is filled with summery goods.

Emerson Fry – I’ve been a fan of Emerson Fry since they went by Emerson Made. They are a small independent company committed to domestic manufacturing and conscious design. They are like the wardrobe you’ve always wanted but could never find.

The Reformation – Fashion + Sustainability. Committed to cutting out the middleman, they manufacture at their own faculty in Los Angeles.

Zady – Just as Everlane provides transparency for pricing, Zady offers an in-depth look at each of the people who work on your garment along the way, from where wool originates, to where it is cleaned and dyed and ultimately knit into a sweater. All supporting US small businesses along the way.

Kelly King Collective – Chicago-made, and just the cutest party dresses. You know all those holiday parties you have? Shop here.

Bevy Goods – We are merging style + purpose to create ethically-made bags for all your day to night moments. Where we (and soon to be you) know every maker by name.

Sign up at Bevy Goods to join us on this journey and be the first to know when we are launching. And while you’re at it, let’s connect on Instagram, Facebook & Twitter!


How my career started at age 5.

BevyGinger_3+halfPrincess Buttercup.

When I was a little girl, around 5, I had an idea that I wanted to make and sell my own perfume. My mom lovingly gave me some of her little perfume sample tubes (probably some Liz Claiborne, Opium and Giorgio) and a few old glass bottles. I mixed and mixed all these smells, and probably threw in some water. But it needed a name (Princess Buttercup! I was 5…) and a label, so out came the construction paper and glue. Then I sold the bottles, that probably smelled like The Golden Girls, to my moms gracious friends.

It was that moment, that creative process of taking a product through the lifecycle of design to sale, that I would uncover 30 years later as the thing that satisfies my soul. The thing that makes everything make sense about how I was created. We all are made with different gifts, different talents, different things that inspire and bring us great joy.  (How was this uncovered? Go read – and answer the questions in – Jon Acuff’s Quitter. Life changing.)

So now, instead of designing perfume from samples from the 80’s (you’re welcome), I design handbags. Bags that are focused on supporting US makers and giving back in our own communities. Sign up to stay up to date on our launch (and Kickstarter!) at BEVY Goods and follow us on Instagram to see what we’re working on, vote on color choices, etc.  A bevy of people – a community – can do great things and impact lives for good.


A Dragon Master teaches us to give


You may have already seen the story of Santino and his dragons on Facebook or the Today Show, but I couldn’t resist spreading the word about this amazing boy and his business. Not only is this a worthwhile cause, but looking through the site gave me a chance to talk with my boys about how God created each of us (our similarities and differences) and having compassion, an open mind and a loving heart. All while they picked out three favorite dragon prints and begged for their own t-shirts.


This is the story of Santino, a 10 year boy, boldly nicknamed “The Dragon Master” by his younger brother. A story that I’m sure is full, but is brought to light because of his dragon drawings. Santino was diagnosed with autism at age 5. One way that he enjoyed expressing himself was through drawing dragons. So after being teased one day, his parents bought him a blank white t-shirt and markers in order to help work through his emotions. As a mom to boys, I find this is brilliant on so many levels, as every day is an attempt to understand my children and help them express themselves.


After a Facebook post from Lisa, Santino’s mom, of him working on a t-shirt went viral and brought in over 100 orders, you can now shop for your own dragon shirts on Santino’s Dragon Drawings website.

“Santino decided to donate half of his money to the Center for Autism, a nonprofit that Lisa said has changed her son’s life by teaching him how to communicate his feelings, problem-solve and understand social cues.

“I don’t want to be the only one who gets the money,” Santino said of why he chose to donate his proceeds. “I want to help other kids with autism.”

Let’s support Santino and his mission to help other kids with autism. Let’s learn from Santino’s generous heart.

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When life gives you lemons, make some limoncello to share with friends & strangers.


As I mentioned previously, I am rebranding Ginger Lane to Bevy. Still Goods for Good, but with the goal of impacting MORE. But there is more to the story. When I heard God’s whispers that He wanted MORE, I was deep into a time of undiagnosed physical pain that prevented me from sewing.  Orders were coming in, my bags were in their first store, trunk shows were planned. But I got to the point that I couldn’t sew without tears streaming down my face due to pain, weakness and numbness.

So I had to stop. I had to accept that I couldn’t keep going. I had to tell people “I’m sorry”, “I can’t fulfill my promise”. I didn’t know what was wrong, so I just had to hope that people would trust me and that I wasn’t just flaking. This pain went on for a year. And the days were filled with doctor’s visits and tests, instead of creating. A partial diagnosis came, horrible medication was given, but the time of stillness gave me a lot of time to pray.

God had so clearly answered prayers with Ginger Lane. I knew that He created me to make, to design, to have a philanthropic company. So why was it all taken away? He kept whispering to me that He wanted MORE. He wanted me to grow the business, to outsource the sewing so that others would have jobs, to build community, to keep giving.

So here we are. Bevy. Goods for Good. A bevy of people, a community, can do great things. I am busy sourcing ethical leathers for our clutches. Busy finding manufactures that help local US towns with jobs. Busy planning ways to continue the giving cycle with every purchase. And so grateful to have you as part of our community.

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Ginger Lane is now BEVY!

Over the last year, God has continued to whisper to me about the journey He wants me to take. I’ve been blessed by the support for my handmade shop Ginger Lane, but I kept hearing Him say He wanted MORE. Less me, more community, so the name is now BEVY*. Still Goods for Good.

I am deep in the process of learning about the sustainable and ethical fashion world in order to make a greater impact. The goal is to create jobs by producing the bags in the US, create community for the makers and customers, to give love & hope.

Join me on this journey by signing up for the newsletter (I promise not to spam!) and be the first to know when we launch, get shop discounts and the occasional joke.

*Why BEVY? With the goal of community, we want to bring together makers & customers. A bevy of women to support one another, share their stories, give love and compassion.

Visit BEVY Goods


A year and a gift for you

(psst….there’s a gift from me to you at the end of the post)

Ginger Lane

One year ago today, my husband and I and some friends were sitting at the Rend Collective/Tenth Ave North concert when I felt a tap on the shoulder. The woman behind me wanted to see my bag. One that I had just made a few hours earlier. She passed it to her friends, gave sweet compliments and said she needed one just like it. At the next break, she handed me her card and asked me to make her one.

Then one of the lead singers came out to discuss Compassion and child sponsorship and everything just clicked. God answered all of my questions and prayers together in one instant. Personal relationships and connecting with people is where my heart is. Yes. It just made sense that we would give back by building relationships with children all over the world.

Our sweet girl is in Rwanda. It is such a joy to learn all about her. She wants to be a businesswoman and a great preacher. She knows about you all, how you are praying for her and supporting her. I have huge dreams about expanding the sponsorships, but until we can, we are also giving a portion of all proceeds to Compassion International. Please consider sponsoring a child.

I am overwhelmingly grateful to all who have been part of this Ginger Lane journey over the past year. I never would have dreamed that it would be a real business with and hundreds of bags sewn and photoshoots and customers and goals and trunk shows.

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

Ginger Lane

The morals of the story? 

God likes to surprise us. Be patient and Trust. His plan for launching my business was a thousand times more fun and encouraging than if I pushed my way and tried in vain to make something happen on my own.

The best free and lasting gift? A genuine compliment. It is selfless for the giver. And highly encouraging for the receiver. Just her words and excitement have carried me through the past year.

Ginger Lane

As a THANK YOU, go to and enjoy 20% off for the rest of April.



(All photographs were taken by Cara Soulia Photography. Read more about how gives back with her photography. All of the models are my friends. To whom I am so grateful for their support on this Ginger Lane journey!)